Gateways help solve the mysteries of the universe. For example, Galaxy Zoo enlisted non-scientists to help categorize astronomical images, whereas LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) captures signals from distant universes. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Boost your cybersecurity with help from Trusted CI, the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence

Trusted CI, the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence, offers a variety of information and services that are relevant to science gateways.

  • Training materials easily accessible online:
    • For gateway development, materials associated with software assurance (writing secure code) and identity management
    • For gateway operation, materials associated with log analysis, incident response, and situational awareness 
  • One-on-one engagements with NSF-funded projects that vary in scope (see the application details, including important dates). Engagements may range from a very brief (couple of weeks) cybersecurity “checkup” to a more in-depth, six-month engagement.
  • Trusted CI also contributes to SGCI's biannual Science Gateways Bootcamp, run by the Incubator, that provides a week-long workshop for gateway PIs and developers.

Finally, we encourage those in the science gateways community to reach out to us and join our mailing lists. We are here to help!

 

Return to Specialized Expertise page

Return to Partners page

Back

Short Survey from Trustworthy Data Working Group: Scientific Data Security Concerns and Practices

The Trustworthy Data Working Group invites scientific researchers and the cyberinfrastructure professionals who support them to complete a short survey about scientific data security concerns and practices.

The working group is a collaborative effort of Trusted CI, the four NSF Big Data Innovation Hubs, the NSF CI CoE Pilot, the Ostrom Workshop on Data Management and Information Governance, the NSF Engagement and Performance Operations Center (EPOC), the Indiana Geological and Water Survey, the Open Storage Network, and other interested community members. The goal of the working group is to understand scientific data security concerns and provide guidance on ensuring the trustworthiness of data.

The purpose of this survey is to:
  • Improve broad understanding of the range of data security concerns and practices for open science
  • Provide input and help shape new guidance for science projects and cyberinfrastructure providers
  • Serve as an opportunity to consider local data security concerns during a voluntary, follow-up interview
Please visit https://surveys.illinois.edu/sec/281601 to complete the survey, and please share this announcement to help us obtain a broad set of responses representing a diversity of perspectives across the scientific community. Multiple individuals from the same organization/project are welcome to take the survey.

Survey results, along with the analysis and applicable guidance, will be published by the Trustworthy Data Working Group as a freely available report by the end of 2020. Please visit https://trustedci.org/trustworthy-data for updated information about the study.

Any questions/comments, please contact Jim Basney at jbasney@illinois.edu.