SGCI webinars bring together community members across the globe.

Our monthly webinars highlight examples of gateways, tools, and best practices

SGCI hosts a webinar series on the second Wednesday of each month at 1 pm Eastern/10 am Pacific (1 hour long). We feature a rotating selection of topics including tool and technology demos, best practices, and gateway showcases. These webinars are recorded for future viewing.

We announce registration for each webinar several weeks ahead through our newsletter and on our website. 

If you have suggestions for future topics, we want to hear it! Please email us at help@sciencegateways.org.

See our archive of previous webinars, including video and slides.

 

Upcoming 2017 Webinar Dates

Want to hear about future webinars? Sign up for our newsletter, and you'll be notified when registration opens each month.

October 11, 2017 at 1 pm Eastern/10 am Pacific

BOINC: Volunteer Computing for Science Gateways

Presented by David Anderson, Research Scientist, Space Sciences Laboratory, at the University of California, Berkeley and Stephen Clark, Purdue and nanoHUB

BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing) is a distributed computing infrastructure based on a centralized server that coordinates volunteer computer resources. The volunteered resources can come from a variety of types of systems including home computers, institutional servers, and smartphones. BOINC has been used as the underlying foundation for a number of distributed computing projects. 

Now, a collaboration between UC Berkeley and Purdue is adding volunteer computing to the nanoHUB nanoscience gateway. Owners of personal computers — Windows, Mac, Linux will be able to support nanoHUB by transparently running compute-intensive nanoHub applications in the background on these computers. The goal is to greatly increase the computing throughput available to nanoHUB (perhaps tens of thousands of CPUs) at a lower cost than that of commercial clouds and dedicated hardware. This will support new paradigms, such as uncertainty quantification and anticipated computing, that can add significant scientific utility to nanoHUB.

We will describe the technical aspects of this work — moving jobs between batch systems, and using virtualization to run Linux jobs on consumer devices — as well as our plans for recruiting volunteers.

Our work will become part of the HUBzero software, allowing any Hub to add its own volunteer computing capability. More generally, the technology we're developing will simplify the task of adding volunteer computing to any science gateway.

November 8, 2017 at 1 pm Eastern/10 am Pacific

Usability Basics
Presented by Paul Parsons, Assistant Professor in Computer Graphics Technology at Purdue University

Further details to be posted.

December 13, 2017 at 1 pm Eastern/10 am Pacific

Gateway Showcase

Volunteers welcome! Email us if you'd like to show off your gateway.